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Things to Know About London Before Visiting

What do I need to know before going to London? How much What should you not wear in London?.Places to Visit in the Lake District (England)
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Things to Know About London Before Visiting

Discover London - As the pictures above show the capital of the UK is a conflagration of ancient and modern, beautifully crafted buildings from ancient times with long histories though to modern skyscrapers and bustling business centres. Find out what you can do and see in London with airGads.com and then book flights, car rental, and hotels in England using our site's easy system.


Certainly London is the single most popular visitor attraction in the UK. With the addition of the British Airways London Eye and the Dome in Docklands, the official landmarks to commemorate the start of the new Millenium, London now offers more exciting tourist attractions to visitors. The British Airways London Eye has won many awards connected to the fields of tourism, engineering and architecture.


The London Eye

The London Eye is one of the largest structures of the city skyline, standing at 140 metres high, only the Canary Wharf, the BT Tower and Tower 42 tower above it. The British Airways London Eye is the world's highest observation wheel offering passengers spectacular panoramic views across the capital on a flight which lasts 30 minutes. In clear weather it is possible to see as far as 25 miles into the distance. Although the eye was conceived, designed and constructed against considerable odds, its success is today undeniable, and it is equally popular with tourists and Londoners alike.


the controversial Millenium

In contrast, the controversial Millenium Dome has been a considerable embarrassment to the current government, due to the unprecedented costs to taxpayers. At a total cost of 758 million pounds, it was not even intended to be a permanent fixture, to last just 25-30 years. There are many Londoners who do not feel it was money well spent and the ongoing press surrounding it has not been generally favourable. Its future continues to remain uncertain.


8 Best Things To Do In London (England)

   

There is absolutely not enough space to list all the activities that you can get involved in and around London, but we have covered the most popular and important to give an interesting insight into the main events and festivals that occur throughout the year.

Festivals and events abound in London, from films to an array of arts. The famous New Year's Eve fireworks and street party in Trafalgar Square and the New Year's Day Parade are probably the most popular attracting a mass exodus to the city centre.


1. City of London Festival


1. City of London Festival

The pealing of the St Mary-le-Bow church bells is traditionally the opening of the annual City of London festival on June 20. The free and ticketed events throughout the 'Square Mile' include classical and jazz music, literature as well as architecture and film.


2. Coin Street Festival


2. Coin Street Festival

During the summer months London's South Bank comes alive and there are numerous brilliant free events in and around Coin Street. In particular, the many riverside music highlights are a wonderfully eclectic mix of musical talents.


3. Nottinghill Carnival


3. Nottinghill Carnival

This really is a spectacularly colourful event which involves a large parade of floats and has been running on the last weekend in August, every year since 1964. The street festival attracts an abundance of revellers who come to pay homage to a very London institution. This again is a free event, although in recent years more emphasis has had to be put on the security of the event, due to the large numbers of people who flock to be a part of this vibrant weekend street party.


4. The London Festival of Chamber Music


4. The London Festival of Chamber Music

The London Festival of Chamber Music was founded in 1995 with the aim of making chamber music accessible to the masses and is hosted at various venues across the city throughout September and October.


5. The Festival of the Thames


5. The Festival of the Thames

The Festival of the Thames, as part of the Lord Mayor's Show on 14th -15th September, is complete with floats, bands and there is also an awesome display of explosions and fireworks across the river on the last night.


6. Guy Fawkes Night 


6. Guy Fawkes Night

Later comes Guy Fawkes Night on the 5th of November when all over London dummy Guy Fawkes men are put on huge bonfires and fireworks displays are held throughout the capital and beyond. This event is attended and celebrated by thousands and thousands of Londoners at many various venues, in fact the number of fireworks being set off and the noise of them seems to increase year on year - at times you would be forgiven for thinking you were in a war-zone! Some of the best displays are held in Battersea Park and at Crystal Palace Park, SE19.


 7. Marble Arch Ice Rink


7. Marble Arch Ice Rink

Marble Arch Ice Rink is opened from mid November onwards and is a real treat! It is both fun and festive and is in a particularly romantic setting.


8. Trafalgar Square lights


8. Trafalgar Square lights

Trafalgar Square lights up in December with the lighting of the Christmas tree and Knightsbridge is also worth visiting where you'll find Harrods beautifully adorned top to bottom in twinkling lights. Oxford and Regent Street also provide Christmas cheer at this time of year with its magically festive sights.


6 Best Places to Visit in London (England):


1. The Tower of London

   

1. The Tower of London

Full of history, the Tower of London has been a fortress, royal palace, government centre and gaol, housing at various times the Royal Mint and Treasury, the Crown Jewels, and the origins of London Zoo. After the Norman invasion, William the Conqueror chose this commanding position over the River Thames and began building the White Tower in 1078.


A flock of ravens with clipped wings are always to be seen on Tower Green. According to legend if the ravens ever depart, the Tower – and the British Empire – will fall.




2. Trafalgar Square


2. Trafalgar Square

London’s most famous square was laid out from 1829 to 1841 to commemorate Nelson’s victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Dominating the square, on a column that is 185ft high, is the 17ft high statue of Nelson. With his friendly pigeons, watch your dark clothes! Around the sides of the square are the church of St. Martin’s in the Fields and the National Gallery.

 

3. Westminster Abbey

 

3. Westminster Abbey

The resting place of the royals, Westminster Abbey is one of the most visited churches in the Christian world. In September 1997, millions of people round the world saw the inside of the Abbey when TV crews covered Princess Di's funeral service. Since then the number of visitors has increased by 300%, and the visit is now more restricted, with some areas cordoned off.

4. St Paul's Cathedral

 

4. St Paul's Cathedral

 The building was constructed by Christopher Wren between 1675 and 1710, but it stands on the site of two previous cathedrals dating back to 604. Its famous dome, the biggest in the world after St Peter's in Rome, no longer dominates London as it did for centuries, but it's still quite a sight when viewed from the river.  

 

There are lots more attractions which we do not have space to place here, needless to say there is plenty to see and do in London.


5. Buckingham Palace


5. Buckingham Palace

The London residence of Queen Elizabeth 2nd. Originally built as a country seat for the duke of Buckingham, Buckingham House was bought in 1762 by George III and converted for his family of 15 children. It only became a royal residence when Victoria took the throne and preferred it to the smaller St. James’ Palace.


Buckingham Palace is a classical building faced with Portland stone and has approximately 600 rooms and 40 acres of gardens. The Royal Standard is flown whenever the Queen is in residence and on special occasions the royal family appear on the balcony.


6. Parliament and Big Ben


6. Parliament and Big Ben

The original Palace of Westminster (still the official name of the Houses of Parliament) was built by Edward the Confessor in 1049 and was a royal residence until Henry VIII moved to the Palace of Whitehall. In 1834 fire destroyed the old building except for the magnificent Westminster Hall.


This spectacular group of buildings on the Thames covers 8 acres of land and is distinguished by the massive Victoria Tower, through which the Queen processes for the State Opening of Parliament, and the famous clock tower, Big Ben, with its 13 and half ton bell which strikes the hours.



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